Knotted Water Sizzled Tongue by Tzu-Huan Lin – Online exhibition with Platform Asia

You are looking at a black-and-white image. The scene is in a wood, you will see trees at the back and tall grass on the ground that reaches the waist of an adult. Two men standing in the center of the image facing each other. They both wearing the ancient look with robes. The man on the left is taller with four eyes, holding a crystal cube. The man on the right has another head attached to his head with white hair. He is holding a book with a rope on a book cover. It looks like the man on the right is talking to the man on the left.

Languages are shapes that have fallen out of our mouths. A story about the attempt to make perfect pronunciation for immigrants.


Exhibition dates: 24 Jan – 11 Feb 22, online – opening at 11 am on 24 Jan.

Platform Asia presents Knotted Water Sizzled Tongue 形聲, a new film by Tzu-Huan Lin, in collaboration with videoclub.

Inspired by the Chinese mythical character of Candjie, Knotted Water Sizzled Tongue traces the learning experience of foreign languages as immigrants. Reflecting on our ability to mimic and speak non-native languages, to the falling of Pixiu, an ancient Chinese mythical creature, from heaven. The work discusses the authenticity of displaced identities and languages, and the embracing of acceptance.

The work will show for the first time in the UK on Platform Asia’s website between 24 Jan – 11 Feb. Having been shortlisted for the 2021 Taipei Art Awards, this programme will run parallel with an exhibition of the work at Taipei Fine Arts Museum till 20 March 2022.

Click here to read about the Taipei Art Awards and exhibition in Taipei.

Supported by Arts Council England. With additional support from British Council Connection through Culture Grants and National Culture and Arts Foundation, Taiwan.

About the artist

Tzu-Huan Lin is an artist based in Brooklyn, New York. An alumnus of the Pratt Institute, Lin’s art primarily focuses on narrative film and immersive installation, exploring different facets of art and issues about the digital age by working with issues that deal with various occurrences. Mythology, history, scientific theories, pseudo-documentary films, and experimental films are some contents dealt with in Lin’s artworks and also the approaches he employs. Through his interpretations of certain issues, he uses diverging narratives to dive into the themes being examined and to shape the artworks created. He also creates spatial installations to enhance the way the audience experiences his way of seeing the world.

林子桓生活與創作於紐約布魯克林。畢業於普瑞特藝術院(Pratt Institute)。創作形式主要以敘事性的影片與沉浸式的空間裝置為主,議題以結合不相同的事件探索藝術不同的樣貌與數位時代的問題。作品內容與方法涉及神話、歷史、科學理論、偽紀錄片以及實驗片等,將議題自我詮釋後以發散的敘事方式漸漸切入主題形塑出作品,另也透過空間裝置強化觀者去感受作者在作品中的的世界觀。作品曾於奧胡斯現代美術館(ARoS Museum)「2021 Flux at ARoS」中放映,近期也參與2020台北數位藝術節「愛情數據」(01_Love)、第六屆台灣國際錄像藝術展「離線瀏覽」(2018,Offline Browser)、第14屆雅典數位藝術節(2018,ADAF);舉辦過的個展有關渡美術館「假想圖集與旅行者(2020,Hypothesis Atlas and Voyager)」、臺北市立美術館「銜尾蛇」(2017,The Yellow Snake Is Waiting)等。

Third Thursdays Brighton – 20 January 2022

A bright yellow head with eye mask looks down upon a group of loving worshippers
A bright yellow head with eye mask looks down upon a group of loving worshippers
Again and Again and Again by Rachel Maclean, 2016

Third Thursdays Brighton, 20 January 2022

Third Thursdays returns in 2022 on 20 January, between 4:30pm and 6:30pm. With music by musicians from Brighton & Hove, and film and video work by artists from across the globe. Curated by videoclub.

Join our walking cinema film trail and watch films projected onto buildings around Brighton; listen to music played around The Lanes, East Street and North Laine; see films by international artists in shop windows, and watch a Digital Stag by artist Thomas Buckley run through Brighton.

Artists in the programme include Rachel Maclean, Megan Broadmeadow, Murat Sayginer, Cattin Tsai, Georgia Tucker and Wong Ping.

To join and follow the film trail, meet at 5:30pm outside East Street Arcade on East Street

More details on the Third Thursdays website.

About Third Thursdays

Third Thursdays is a new arts, music and culture programme that aims to make the centre of Brighton more vibrant, through events, performances, film projections and new artwork commissions.

Third Thursdays will be an opportunity to showcase creative work for people to participate in, including exhibition openings, events, music performances and film projections.

See the programme on the Third Thursdays website: thirdthursdaysbrighton.com

To find out more about opportunities for artists, creatives and audiences, join our mailing list by clicking here.  Or follow us on social media: Facebook // Twitter // Instagram.

Third Thursdays is part of the ABCD Cultural Recovery Plan, supported by Arts Council England, Brighton & Hove City Council, Brilliant Brighton Business Improvement District, Pebble Trust and the Welcome Back Fund (European Regional Development Fund).

Call out for stewards – paid opportunity

We’re looking for people who would be willing to be stewards and help support the delivery of Third Thursdays. To work with us to deliver our outdoor walking film trail, support musicians and to oversee films in windows. May require a little light lifting.

Dates: 17 Feb, 17 Mar, 21 Apr, between 3pm and 8pm. £10 an hour plus expenses.

If you are  interested, email Jamie Wyld at: jamie@videoclub.org.uk

About ABCD Cultural Recovery Plan

The disruption of the pandemic brought together over 100 creatives in Brighton & Hove to explore how arts & culture can be more inclusive, sustainable and collaborative in the City in the future. This resulted in a recovery plan that runs to the end of 2022 and has so far raised over £350k for the cultural sector in the City. The plan is overseen by an independent group of people formed of a Governance Group and a series of Working Groups. Our aims are to create paid work and professional opportunities for creative workers in the City, to develop a more inclusive cultural offer and to encourage partnership working to strengthen the creative sector in the long term.

Our partners include Brighton & Hove City Council, Arts Council England, Brilliant Brighton Business Improvement District, the Pebble Trust and many funded arts organisations in the City. If you work in the creative industries and want to get involved and/or find out more visit cultureinourcity.com

                               

Screening, exhibition & commission opportunities for Third Thursdays

THIRD THURSDAYS – A MONTHLY OPPORTUNITY TO ENGAGE WITH COMMUNITIES AND AUDIENCES THROUGH ART, MUSIC AND CULTURE.

Third Thursdays is a new arts, music and culture programme that aims to make the centre of Brighton more vibrant, through events, performances, film projections and new artwork commissions. It will create moments each third Thursday of the month for residents and visitors to engage with art and culture around the centre of Brighton.

Third Thursdays will be an opportunity to showcase creativity and involve audiences with artistic work, including exhibition openings, events, music performances and film projections. It will be a chance to reach people interested in arts, film, culture and music, and audiences who are shopping, socialising, and seeking entertainment around every corner.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED

There are several ways to get involved and participate in Third Thursdays for artists and organisations.

1. Submit an event – organisations and businesses can propose an event for Third Thursdays as part of the programme. This could be for an existing or new event such as an exhibition opening, cultural event, performance, film screening, talk or a creative new product launch. We want to help promote and include your event as part of Third Thursdays’ cultural programme. Scroll down to find out more.

2. Create and show artwork – artists, collectives and groups in Brighton & Hove can apply for production fees to make and show work for Third Thursdays.

– 6 event / exhibition fees of up to £500.

– 8 exhibition fees of up to £1,000.

– 2 commission fees of up to £6,000.

Scroll down to find out more.

3. Submit work for screening or exhibition – we’ll be delivering a programme of projections and screenings in Brighton, and we’ll be curating programmes from material submitted to us. Open to UK and international artists. Scroll down to find out more.

4. Virtual international exchange for 2 disabled, D/deaf, Neurodivergent or chronically ill artists – we are delivering an online residency exchange in collaboration with Videotage in Hong Kong as part of our seventh Both Sides Now programme. Scroll down to find out more.

We particularly encourage submissions from artists and organisations who are from diverse backgrounds. (See FAQs for information.)

There are budgets for access support, which can be discussed if work is selected for exhibition or commission.

View this information in a document by clicking here. See application FAQs by clicking here.

1. SUBMIT AN EVENT

Submit an event for Third Thursdays as part of the programme. This could be an exhibition opening, cultural event, performance, film screening or talk. We want to include and help promote your events and activities as part of Third Thursdays’ cultural programme.

We’ve put together a simple submission form, so we can find out which Third Thursday you want to present on, what the event is, who it’s aimed at and its location.

To be part of the Third Thursdays programme events must:

– Take place on one of the Third Thursday dates: 20 Jan 22, 17 Feb 22, 17 Mar 22, 21 Apr 22.

– Have an artistic, creative or cultural component to the event – this could include design, videogaming, visual art, performing arts, creative media, sound art, heritage, film, music or fashion.

TO SUBMIT AN EVENT OR ACTIVITY FOR INCLUSION IN THE PROGRAMME, CLICK HERE.

2. CREATE AND SHOW ARTWORK

Artists, collectives and groups can apply for commission fees to make and show work for Third Thursdays.

– 6 event / exhibition fees of up to £500.

– 8 exhibition fees of up to £1,000.

– 2 commission fees of up to £6,000.

Submissions can be made by individuals, collectives, or groups who are based in Brighton & Hove. A number of these commissions will be dedicated to early career artists from diverse backgrounds (see FAQs for definition), supported by The Pebble Trust.

The aim is to show work in public spaces using projection in outdoor areas in the Brilliant Brighton Business Improvement District. Proposals must be for work that is made for projectable exhibition – this could be film & video (artists’ film & video, heritage film, narrative), digital work, videogames, etc. We suggest proposing artwork that will work well in public spaces – work that attracts and can hold attention, or that can enhance a location or tell a story in an accessible way.

Work must be shown in the Brilliant Brighton Business Improvement District (BID). You are asked to suggest where your work might be exhibited in the BID area (click here, then click on ‘MAP’).

We would like to know where you see your work being shown, and how you want to exhibit it. What location would it need to be shown? (For example, an outside wall or a window onto the street at a certain location.) Does it need sound? Giving us a sense of how and where the work might be experienced will help us assess your application.

> UP TO £500 AND £1,000 EXHIBITION FEES

Budgets up to £500 and £1,000 are to support the delivery of events and exhibition of work. You can apply for costs towards such as:

– Artists’ fees.

– Technical costs.

– Equipment hire.

Applicants will need to provide:

– Evidence of past work – through a website link / online.

– A basic budget breakdown.

– A description of the planned work.

– A proposed location.

– A description of how you are ensuring accessibility of the work shown.

DEADLINES FOR SUBMISSIONS AND THEMES FOR DATES

TO APPLY FOR AN EXHIBITION FEE OF UP TO £500 OR £1,000, CLICK HERE TO COMPLETE AN APPLICATION.

If you would simply like to submit a work for screening or exhibition (without also organising its exhibition) – then please submit your work by clicking here.

—–

> UP TO £6,000 COMMISSION FEE

There are two commission fees for £6,000:

– One is aimed at developing a project with young people or children, with resulting work exhibited as projection outdoors.

– One is aimed at creating a larger scale new work for exhibition via projection outdoors.

> WORKING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE OR CHILDREN COMMISSION

We want an artist or group to work with young people or children in Brighton & Hove to create a new work for exhibition for Third Thursdays in April (21/04/22).

The artwork could be a film, video or digital work made for projection. Children or young people could be involved in the work’s design, content (visual/sound), narrative or production. They should have some involvement in the creative development of the work.

Applicants will need to provide:

– Description of the proposed project.

– Evidence of a connection with a school or youth group.

– Proposal for where work with young people or children will take place – online or real life. And how COVID-19 safety will be managed if in real life.

– Evidence of previous success working with young people or children.

– A completed DBS check.

– Link to previous work – online portfolio or website with CV, images, video.

– A method for engaging young people with the work – for example, what you see their involvement being creatively. What will they learn from the project?

– Timeline/plan for delivery of the work.

– A budget breakdown.

– Description of how you are ensuring accessibility of the work shown.

– Location for exhibition.

– How you will respond to April’s theme, which is Memory.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS: 20 JANUARY 2022

TO APPLY FOR A COMMISSION FEE OF UP TO £6,000 TO WORK WITH YOUNG PEOPLE, CLICK HERE TO COMPLETE AN APPLICATION.

> LARGE SCALE EXHIBITION COMMISSION

We invite submissions for a new work by an artist/s based in Brighton & Hove for exhibition via projection in the Brighton BID area. To be exhibited for Third Thursdays in April (21/04/22).

We want to see proposals that will engage audiences and inspire them in accessible ways. Work could be in the form of film, video or digital work (including projection mapping or videogames) – we are open to artists’ suggestions. With work being projectable / exhibitable in the BID area – click here and see ‘Map’.   

Applicants will need to provide:

– Description of the proposed project.

– Link to previous work – online portfolio or website with CV, images, video.

– Timeline/plan for delivery of the work.

– A budget breakdown.

– Description of how you are ensuring accessibility of the work shown.

– Location for exhibition.

– How you will respond to April’s theme, which is Memory.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS: 20 JANUARY 2022
TO APPLY FOR A COMMISSION FEE OF UP TO £6,000 TO DEVELOP A LARGE SCALE ARTWORK, CLICK HERE TO COMPLETE AN APPLICATION.

3. SUBMIT WORK FOR SCREENING OR EXHIBITION

We’ll be delivering a programme of projections and screenings in Brighton, curated from material submitted to us. Submissions will be accepted by artists and filmmakers locally, from the UK and internationally.

SCREENING SUBMISSIONS

Screening submissions, if selected, will be shown via our mobile cinema, which will show works on walls around the BID area.

Artists and filmmakers can submit up to 2 films for each deadline. Submissions can be artists’ film & video, experimental film, Machinima, short film or digital works.

Criteria for screening submissions:

– Between 2 and 5 minutes in length.

– Be engaging for viewers who may be passing by or watching throughout, for example be visually stimulating, humorous, narrative, spectacular, fun, surprising and accessible.

– For public / outdoor exhibition (i.e. be suitable for children and adults in public).

– Work must be in digital format and be high enough in resolution to show at scale.

A screening fee of £50 will be paid if work is shown in the programme.

DEADLINES FOR SUBMISSIONS AND THEMES FOR DATES

TO SUBMIT YOUR WORK, CLICK HERE.

EXHIBITION SUBMISSIONS

Exhibition submissions will be shown at static sites in the BID area. This might include projection onto walls of buildings or inside windows in stores. Works will be shown as part of a programme or on a loop. Submissions will be accepted by artists and filmmakers locally, across the UK and internationally.

Artists and filmmakers can submit up to 2 works for each deadline. Submissions can be artists’ film & video, experimental film, Machinima or digital works. This programme is for longer form or loop-able works. Submit gallery-based work to this programme.

Criteria for exhibition submissions:

– No minimum length.

– Be engaging for viewers who may be passing by or watching throughout, for example be visually stimulating, spectacular, surprising and accessible.

– For public / outdoor exhibition (i.e. suitable for children and adults in public).

– Work must be in digital format and be high enough in resolution to show at scale.

An exhibition fee of £100 will be paid if work is shown in the programme.

DEADLINES FOR SUBMISSIONS AND THEMES FOR DATES

TO SUBMIT YOUR WORK, CLICK HERE.

4. CALL OUT: ONLINE RESIDENCY FOR 2 DISABLED, D/DEAF AND/OR NEURODIVERGENT ARTISTS BASED IN BRIGHTON & HOVE

videoclub is delivering a month-long online residency exchange in collaboration with Videotage in Hong Kong as part of videoclub and Videotage’s seventh Both Sides Now programme.

Residencies will take place on videoclub’s Vital Capacities virtual residency space: vitalcapacities.com and on Videotage’s Minecraft residency. Residencies will take place in February 2022. Deadline for submissions is: 12 January 2022.

ABOUT THE RESIDENCY

The programme invites applications for the residency from disabled, D/deaf and Neurodivergent artists based in Brighton & Hove. There are 2 opportunities available, with fees of £1,000 for participation plus £500 of production costs. There are additional access support budgets available, which can be organised depending on requirements. Residencies are part-time only and can be worked around your schedule.

Work produced will be exhibited as part of Third Thursdays and as part of an exhibition on Vital Capacities’ website. It may also be included in screenings in the UK and Hong Kong.

Both Sides Now 7’s theme is environmentalism. We invite applicants to consider how they might explore this theme through their residency and work. It might help to look at previous residencies on Vital Capacities to see how others have approached their work.

HOW TO APPLY

To submit a simple expression of interest (name, email and links to previous work) for the residency, click here.

ABOUT BOTH SIDES NOW

Both Sides Now is a tactical programme partnership between Videotage (HK) and videoclub (UK). Which uses contemporary and historical film and video work to explore developments within the culture and society of Hong Kong, China, and the UK, and beyond.

About Third Thursdays

Third Thursdays is a new arts, music and culture programme that aims to make the centre of Brighton more vibrant, through events, performances, film projections and new artwork commissions. It will create moments each third Thursday of the month, beginning on 16 December, for residents and visitors to engage with art and culture around the centre of Brighton.

Third Thursdays will be an opportunity to showcase creative work for people to participate in, including exhibition openings, events, music performances and film projections.

See the programme on the Third Thursdays website: thirdthursdaysbrighton.com

                               

Sponsored by Feonic:

Call out: online residency for 2 disabled, D/deaf and/or Neurodivergent artists based in Brighton & Hove

A bonfire on the beach of a large lake at sunrise, blue skies with an orange morning glow in the distance.
A young woman in a wheelchair looks into a mirror reflectively. Behind windows open out onto a blue sky.
Nadine Mckenzie created ‘A Will, My Wheels, and a Way’ as part of their Vital Capacities residency in 2021

We are delivering a month-long online residency exchange in collaboration with Videotage in Hong Kong as part of videoclub and Videotage’s seventh Both Sides Now programme. Residencies will take place on videoclub’s Vital Capacities virtual residency space: vitalcapacities.com and on Videotage’s Minecraft residency. Residencies will take place in February 2022. Deadline for submissions is: 12 January 2022.

The programme invites applications for the residency from disabled, D/deaf and Neurodivergent artists based in Brighton & Hove. There are 2 opportunities available, with fees of £1,000 for participation plus £500 of production costs. There are additional access support budgets available, which can be organised depending on requirements. Residencies are part-time only and can be worked around your schedule.

Work produced will be exhibited as part of Third Thursdays and as part of an exhibition on Vital Capacities’ website. It may also be included in screenings in the UK and Hong Kong.

Both Sides Now 7’s theme is environmentalism. We invite applicants to consider how they might explore this theme through their residency and work. It might help to look at previous residencies on Vital Capacities to see how others have approached their work. 

To submit a simple expression of interest (name, email and links to previous work) for the residency, click here.

About Both Sides Now

Both Sides Now is a tactical programme partnership between Videotage (HK) and videoclub (UK). Which uses contemporary and historical film and video work to explore developments within the culture and society of Hong Kong, China, and the UK, and beyond.

     

Arts Council England funding logo (Lottery)     

About Third Thursdays

Third Thursdays is a new arts, music and culture programme that aims to make the centre of Brighton more vibrant, through events, performances, film projections and new artwork commissions. It will create moments each third Thursday of the month, beginning on 16 December, for residents and visitors to engage with art and culture around the centre of Brighton.

Third Thursdays will be an opportunity to showcase creative work for people to participate in, including exhibition openings, events, music performances and film projections.

See the programme on the Third Thursdays website: thirdthursdaysbrighton.com

                               

Sponsored by Feonic:

Blog post for Culture in Our City on Third Thursdays 16 Dec

Lawrence Lek, Play Station, 2017

Our director, Jamie Wyld, has written a blog post about Third Thursdays on 16 December – get an insight into this month’s theme and some background to artworks in the programme, click here to read.

To find out more about Third Thursdays, go to the website by clicking here.

Third Thursdays Brighton on 16 Dec

Dynasty Handbag, Vat Do You Vahnt For Bwekfas?, 2016

Third Thursdays – a monthly opportunity to see, experience and take part in art, music and culture. 

Third Thursdays is a new arts, music and culture programme that aims to make the centre of Brighton more vibrant, through events, performances, film projections and new artwork commissions. It will create moments each third Thursday of the month, beginning on 16 December between 5 and 7pm, for residents and visitors to engage with art and culture around the centre of Brighton. 

Third Thursdays will be an opportunity to showcase creative work for people to participate in, including exhibition openings, events, music performances and film projections.

See the programme on the Third Thursdays website: thirdthursdaysbrighton.com

To find out more about opportunities for artists, creatives and audiences, join our mailing list by clicking here.  Or follow us on social media: Facebook // Twitter // Instagram.

Third Thursdays is part of the ABCD Cultural Recovery Plan, supported by Arts Council England, Brighton & Hove City Council, Brilliant Brighton Business Improvement District, Pebble Trust and the Welcome Back Fund (European Regional Development Fund).

Call out for stewards – paid opportunity

We’re looking for people who would be willing to be stewards and help support the delivery of Third Thursdays. To work with us to deliver our outdoor walking film trail, support musicians and to oversee films in windows. May require a little light lifting.

Date: 16 December, between 2pm and 9pm. £10 an hour plus expenses.

If you are  interested, email Jamie Wyld at: jamie@videoclub.org.uk

About ABCD Cultural Recovery Plan

The disruption of the pandemic brought together over 100 creatives in Brighton & Hove to explore how arts & culture can be more inclusive, sustainable and collaborative in the City in the future. This resulted in a recovery plan that runs to the end of 2022 and has so far raised over £350k for the cultural sector in the City. The plan is overseen by an independent group of people formed of a Governance Group and a series of Working Groups. Our aims are to create paid work and professional opportunities for creative workers in the City, to develop a more inclusive cultural offer and to encourage partnership working to strengthen the creative sector in the long term. 

Our partners include Brighton & Hove City Council, Arts Council England, Brilliant Brighton Business Improvement District, the Pebble Trust and many funded arts organisations in the City. If you work in the creative industries and want to get involved and/or find out more visit cultureinourcity.com

                              

Sponsored by Feonic:

Both Sides Now: Queer – recorded panel talks

3 frames from Zoom webinar including speakers Jia Tan, Beatrice Wong and Danielle Braithwaite-Shirley

Both Sides Now: Queer – recorded panel talks

In October 21, we participated in SPARK Festival 21, delivered by British Council Hong Kong. We presented Both Sides Now: Queer – a programme of films and two panel discussions. The two talks are now available to watch:

Panel discussion led by Lucia King (Researcher, curator and lecturer in Moving Image, University of Brighton, UK) with artists Rob Crosse (UK) and Nicole Pun (HK). Crosse and Pun took part in international exchange residencies with Both Sides Now in 2019. Find out more about the panelists by clicking here.

 

Panel discussion led by Jia Tan (Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies in the Department of Cultural and Religious Studies at The Chinese University of Hong Kong) with artists Danielle Braithwaite-Shirley (UK) and Beatrice Wong (HK). Find out more about the panelists by clicking here.

Talks took place as part of SPARK Festival 21, delivered by British Council Hong Kong in partnership with videoclub and Videotage.

 

Both Sides Now is a tactical program that uses film and video to explore culture and society between different nations, the UK, Hong Kong, and beyond. It is delivered annually by videoclub and Videotage.

     

Arts Council England funding logo (Lottery)          

Both Sides Now: Queer at SPARK Festival 21 HK/UK

A person looks up facing the ceiling. The word queer in capital letters is written in the centre.
A person looks up facing the ceiling. The word queer in capital letters is written in the centre.
Matt Lambert, God is Watching, 2017 (courtesy of the artist, Tate and Random Acts)

videoclub and Videotage present Both Sides Now: Queer as part of SPARK Festival 2021, delivered by British Council Hong Kong.

Join filmmakers from the UK and Hong Kong to explore aspects of LGBTQI+ life, reflecting upon Queer identity, life and creativity.

Both Sides Now: Queer features eight short films (available to stream on-demand between 20-23 October during SPARK) and two accompanying panel talks, looking at the way in which filmmakers are exploring Queer culture, using various film and video techniques to explore aspects of Queer life in Hong Kong and the UK.

See the full programme and book talks for SPARK 2021 now on British Council’s website.

Film programme

Anson Mak, Differences Do Matter, 1998, 3 mins
Ming Wong, Learn German with Petra Von Kant, 2017, 8 mins
Jay Bernard, Something Said, 2017, 7:33 mins
Matt Lambert, God is Watching, 2017, 3:24 mins
Lucie Rachel, Where We Are Now, 2016, 9:29 mins
Rob Crosse, Dear Samuel, 2019, 9:30 mins
Nicole Pun, To be Brandon (Scene 1), 2019, 4:06 mins
Nicole Pun, To be Brandon (Scene 2), 2019, 6:58 mins

Film programme will be available to watch between 20 and 23 October. Visit the website to watch during those dates. Watch the film programme by clicking here.

Talks programme

Talks can be booked now on the British Council website by clicking here. Find out more about the speakers in the programme by clicking here.

Date and time: 22 October at 11am UK (6pm HK)

Participants: Rob Crosse (artist, UK)), Nicole Pun (artist, HK), Lucia King (moderator, UK) 

Panellists will discuss what sector support is needed and available for LGBTQ+ artists and filmmakers, and where best practice exists. Led by Lucia King (Researcher, curator and lecturer in Moving Image, University of Brighton, UK) with artists Rob Crosse (UK) and Nicole Pun (HK). Crosse and Pun took part in international exchange residencies with Both Sides Now in 2019.

Date and time: 23 October at 9am UK time (4pm HK)

Participants: Danielle Braithwaite-Shirley (artist, UK), Beatrice Wong (artist, HK), Jia Tan (moderator, HK)

Panellists will discuss how Trans artists and filmmakers can be supported better, what challenges there are and what the sector needs to do to support Trans makers. Led by Jia Tan (Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies in the Department of Cultural and Religious Studies at The Chinese University of Hong Kong) with artists Danielle Braithwaite-Shirley (UK) and Beatrice Wong (HK).

Register now on the British Council website by clicking here. Learn more about the speakers in the programme by clicking here.

Both Sides Now is a tactical program that uses film and video to explore culture and society between different nations, the UK, Hong Kong, and beyond. It is delivered annually by videoclub and Videotage. 

     

Arts Council England funding logo (Lottery)          

SPARK – Both Sides Now: Queer – Panel discussions

Panellists from top left (22 Oct): Lucia King, Nicole Pun, Rob Crosse. And from bottom left (23 Oct): Jia Tan, Danielle Braithwaite-Shirley, Beatrice Wong.

Two panel discussions take place on 22 and 23 October, which complement the Both Sides Now: Queer film programme.

Date and time: 22 October at 11am UK (6pm HK)

Participants: Rob Crosse (artist, UK)), Nicole Pun (artist, HK), Lucia King (moderator, UK) 

Panellists will discuss what sector support is needed and available for LGBTQ+ artists and filmmakers, and where best practice exists. Led by Lucia King (Researcher, curator and lecturer in Moving Image, University of Brighton, UK) with artists Rob Crosse (UK) and Nicole Pun (HK). Crosse and Pun took part in international exchange residencies with Both Sides Now in 2019.

Register now on the British Council website by clicking here.

Rob Crosse is a filmmaker and photographer born 1985 in Hertfordshire, UK, studied Photography at the Arts University Bournemouth and completed his MFA in Fine Arts at the Slade School of Fine Art, London. He was a participant in the Berlin Programme for Artists BPA from 2019 to 2020. In 2020 he was awarded the Ars Viva Prize along with Sung Tieu and Richard Sides.

His recent solo and group exhibitions include Ars Viva 2020 Museum Angewandte Kunst, Frankfurt am Main, DE, Bad Bodies at Tomorrow Maybe, Eaton, HK and Solo Presentations, Jerwood, London, UK. His films have been shown as part of Lafayette Anticipations, Foundation d’entreprise Galeries Lafayette, Paris, FR; Video Art at Midnight, Babylon Cinema, Berlin, DE; Queer: Both Sides Now V, Videotage, HK; Different Ways, Lux, London, UK; and Transactions of Desire, Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, UK, among others. He has completed residencies as part of videoclub and Videotage Both Sides Now, at Eaton, HK; Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Nebraska, US; Katara Art Center, Doha, QA and Foundation Marcelino Botin, Santander, ES.

Nicole Pun is a visual artist based in Hong Kong. She uses photography, video, performance to explore queer identity, desire and female representation. She received her MFA from California Institute of the Arts. She has a BSSc from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, with a background in Journalism and Communication. Her work has been exhibited in Circus Gallery in Los Angeles; Avenue 50 Studio in Los Angeles; SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco; McGroarty Arts Center in Tujunga; “In & Out” Nicole Pun Solo Exhibition at Lumenvisum in Hong Kong. Her work is in numerous private and museum collections.  She is the recipient of several grants and awards, including Yale-China Arts Fellowship at Yale University, WMA Masters Special Mention Award.

Lucía King is a researcher and curator; and as an artist working in drawing, painting and installation. She is engaged as a researcher of artists’ moving image. King acquired a PhD from SOAS Centre for Media and Film (University of London) specialising in the creative methodologies of South Asian artists’ filmmakers and experimental documentary filmmakers. King is also curator of artists’ moving image and, in 2014, she founded VisionMix, an artist-led professional network of artists, filmmakers and curators that operates transnationally.

Date and time: 23 October at 9am UK time (4pm HK)

Participants: Danielle Braithwaite-Shirley (artist, UK), Beatrice Wong (artist, HK), Jia Tan (moderator, HK)

Panellists will discuss how Trans artists and filmmakers can be supported better, what challenges there are and what the sector needs to do to support Trans makers. Led by Jia Tan (Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies in the Department of Cultural and Religious Studies at The Chinese University of Hong Kong) with artists Danielle Braithwaite-Shirley (UK) and Beatrice Wong (HK).

Register now on the British Council website by clicking here.

Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley creates work that seeks to archive the Black Trans experience, “using technology to imagine our lives in environments that centre our bodies.”

They work predominantly in animation, sound, performance and video games, intertwining lived experience with fiction to record the lives of Black Trans people and imaginatively retell Black Trans stories.

Beatrice Wong, born 1980 in HK and based in HK ever since, is a transgender outsider artist with a lifelong struggle with mental issues. Wong expresses her dilemmas in life through personal creative projects and mediums including stand-up comedy. Contributing to the LGBTQ anthology ‘Intimate Strangers: True Stories from Queer Asia’, short films screened at various LGBTQIA film festivals around the globe, and recently, photography with her WMA Masters finalist work ‘No Opportunities (for Beatrice)’ being exhibited in Hong Kong City Hall. Beatrice also DJs as Misty Penguin.

Jia Tan is Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies in the Department of Cultural and Religious Studies at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. She received her doctoral degree in critical studies of cinema and television from the University of Southern California.

Her research on digital media, feminism, queer culture. Currently, she serves as an Associate Member for Institute for Transpacific Cultural Research, Simon Fraser University, Canada. She is also on the editorial board of Communication, Culture, and Critique, one of the journals affiliated with the International Communication Association (ICA).

Find out more and register on the British Council website by clicking here.

Both Sides Now is a tactical program that uses film and video to explore culture and society between different nations, the UK, Hong Kong, and beyond. It is delivered annually by videoclub and Videotage.

     

Arts Council England funding logo (Lottery)          

Reverberation – Vital Capacities’ latest exhibition

Image represents four artists work, top left: a still image from Siphenathi Mayekiso’s film Echoes of Identity, which shows a man with bare chest and arms across his face against a blue sky; top right: a still image from Rebekah Ubuntu’s film Ecologies of Belonging (a Meditation in Progress), which shows a person standing in the centre of a sandy footpath with long grass either side, in the distance to the left if the sea and clouds in the sky; bottom right: a still image from Nadine Mckenzie’s film A Will, My Wheels and a Way, which shows a young woman sat in a wheelchair reflected in a mirror, a wall of windows shows buildings and blue sky outside; bottom left picture: a dirt track footpath leads into the distance through a field, the ground is a deep red, making the grass on the sides of the path almost black in colour, trees can be seen on the horizon in the distance with clouds and a little blue sky above.
Image represents four artists work, top left: a still image from Siphenathi Mayekiso’s film Echoes of Identity, which shows a man with bare chest and arms across his face against a blue sky; top right: a still image from Rebekah Ubuntu’s film Ecologies of Belonging (a Meditation in Progress), which shows a person standing in the centre of a sandy footpath with long grass either side, in the distance to the left if the sea and clouds in the sky; bottom right: a still image from Nadine Mckenzie’s film A Will, My Wheels and a Way, which shows a young woman sat in a wheelchair reflected in a mirror, a wall of windows shows buildings and blue sky outside; bottom left picture: a dirt track footpath leads into the distance through a field, the ground is a deep red, making the grass on the sides of the path almost black in colour, trees can be seen on the horizon in the distance with clouds and a little blue sky above.
All four artists’ work, beginning bottom right clockwise: Nadine Mckenzie, A Will, My Wheels and a Way, 2021; …kruse, Directionsgreat to Storyplace, 2021; Siphenathi Mayekiso, Echoes of Identity, 2021; artwork still, Ecologies of Belonging (a Meditation in Progress) by Rebekah Ubuntu, courtesy of the Artist. Find Rebekah online @rebekahubuntu.

In August 2021, we worked with four artists-in-residence on Vital Capacities, two from South Africa, Siphenathi Mayekiso and Nadine Mckenzie, and two from the UK, …kruse and Rebekah Ubuntu. All four artists were invited to research and explore ideas, and to share them during the residency. Each artist has produced work that resonates with the work they did throughout the residency, reflecting on memory, personal narratives, experience, and movement. See the exhibition: vitalcapacities.com

Siphenathi Mayekiso has created a poetic movement storytelling film, which takes the viewer on a journey, reflecting on our perception of what we think others see when they look at us. Echoes of Identity is a personal interrogation using the body to build a dialogue about the self.

Nadine Mckenzie’s film, A Will, My Wheels and a Way is a powerful personal narrative that reflects on the car accident which led to Mckenzie being paralysed. The film brings together memories, interviews with family and friends, and interpretive dance to portray Mckenzie’s close connection to her wheelchair.

…kruse’s residency resulted in two works, Stumpsoft to Hungerdream and Directionsgreat to Storyplace, which came out of …kruse’s investigation into her relationship with paths and walking. Both works contain what …kruse describes as word drawings, poetic wanderings and meanderings over old and new paths.

Rebekah Ubuntu decided to focus on reflecting and taking pause during their residency; reading and meditating on Alexis Pauline Gumbs’ book Undrowned: Black Feminist Lessons from Marine Mammals. Ubuntu has created Ecologies of Belonging (a Meditation in Progress) in response to their time in residence.

August’s programme was delivered in partnership with Institute for Creative Arts – University of Cape Town and Wysing Arts Centre. With support from Arts Council England.

 

Vital Capacities is an accessible, purpose-built digital residency space, that supports artists’ practice while engaging audiences with their work.

Vital Capacities has been created by videoclub in consultation with artists, digital inclusion specialist Sarah Pickthall and website designer Oli Pyle.

       

 

Arts Council England funding logo (Lottery)

Solo Exhibition: Hibernation Dream by Zara Sands until 30 September 21

Still from Hibernation Dream, Zara Sands, 2021 – courtesy of the artist.

An office worker attempts hibernating in a remote forest. With her eyes closed she dreams, hearing recorded sounds of wild animals. Her dream soon becomes a nightmare as she turns into a distortion of the wild animal she once dreamed of.

videoclub presents Hibernation Dream, a solo exhibition by Zara Sands during 1-30 September 21 on our website. This exhibition premieres her film, Hibernation Dream, a collaborative project with composer, Will Chaffey.

A text describing the film’s audio can be downloaded here for D/deaf and hard of hearing audiences: Downloadable description of film audio

A text visually describing the film can be downloaded here for blind and partially sighted audiences: Descriptive transcript of the film

About the film

Hibernation Dream was born out of artistic research between the film’s dancer/director and the composer, Zara Sands and Will Chaffey. The aim was to explore the use of subjective and interpretive ideas to set objective criteria. Specifically looking at the concept of what is ‘natural’ and the experience of trying to fulfil this in modern life.

The film  investigates raw and impulsive ways of expressing this through movement and sound. Sands proceeded to create a film that structured improvised movement with distorted performed sound. Through filmmaking, she sought to build a bizarre illustration of these experiences expressed using her and Chaffey’s perspectives.

Exhibition dates

Hibernation Dream will be showing between 1 Sept till 30 Sept 2021.

Online workshops

Along with the exhibition, Hibernation Dream will present two online workshops between 16-17 September. Extending from Sands’s research, the workshop explores how our idiosyncrasies and subjective experiences of the world manifest through the expression of sound and dance. Visit links below for details about the workshops.

Tickets and booking details

Descriptive Improvisation Guide

This is an accessible video which functions as an open improvisation guide, while also being interpretable as a spoken description of the performance. The text is an original score created following the project’s movement research and was used while performing in front of the camera for the film.

Before watching and responding, ensure you are fixed in a comfortable position and that there are no obstructions within your area of movement. This video can be used with the film’s sound, with your own choice of sound or your imagination. Feel free to prepare yourself with a blanket if this suits your preference.

Hibernation Dream journal

Find out about the artist’s journey in the development of Hibernation Dream: https://www.zarasands.com/hibernation-dream-journal

Feedback to the artist

Please give your feedback to the artist about her work through this feedback form: https://forms.gle/JyV4p8ui6EiMWZfk7

About the artist

Zara Sands is a London and South-East based artist working with dance, film and sound.  Having a broad spanning practice as a creative, that is informed by Sands’s research into one’s body and movement vocabularies, she is interested in using material from the body that births the thought being expressed. She enjoys using this to develop, stretch and challenge idiosyncratic movement vocabularies.

With thanks to Screen South & Jamie Wyld for their help initiating the project. Hibernation Dream is supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England.

Selected 11 – film and video programme – watch now

A young man sits in the back of a car staring downwards intently. He wears a black cap and pink hoodie. The car is grey with shimmers of green on the paint form the light outside. The street ooutside is dark, but lit by the headlights of traffic from the cars behind and the streetlights and buildings nearby.

Programme of work:

  • Gaby Sahhar, Truth and Kinship, 2020, 9:26 mins
  • Sam GrantFinal Poetic, 2020, 1:49 mins
  • River Cao, River is My Hometown, 2021, 8:05 mins
  • Aoibheann Greenan, Dingbox, 2020, 5 min
  • Katayoun Jalilipour, Soosk, 2021, 12 mins
  • Roxy Rezvany, Wifi Rider, 2020, 13 mins

Further down the page you can watch the films individually.

Selected 11 brings together some of the best work from early career film and video artists from across the UK in a vibrant programme of recent artists’ moving image. The nominators for this year’s programme of Selected (and the artists shortlisted for the Jarman Award in 2020) are: Michelle Williams Gamaker, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Jenn Nkiru, Project Art Works, Larissa Sansour and Andrea Luka Zimmerman.

The artists for the 11th programme of Selected are: River Cao, Sam Grant, Aoibheann Greenan, Katayoun Jalilipour, Roxy Rezvany and Gaby Sahhar.

Screening and exhibitions of programme online

Selected 11 will be showing across the UK with partners throughout 23-29 August 2021, including online with Nottingham Contemporary, Spike Island (Bristol), Phoenix (Leicester) and a live screening at Fabrica Gallery (Brighton) on 2 September. The programme will be available on our site during 23-29 August.

In conversation with artists with Nottingham Contemporary on 25 August

An in conversation with artists Aoibheann Greenan, Katayoun Jalilipour and Roxy Rezvany talking with Ian Haydn Smith (editor of Curzon Magazine) will launch online on 25 August at 6:30pm. Watch the talk by clicking here.

In conversation with artists with Spike Island on 26 August

An in conversation with artists River Cao, Sam Grant and Gaby Sahhar talking with Ian Haydn Smith (editor of Curzon Magazine) will take place live online on 26 August at 6pm. Watch the talk by clicking here.

Book a ticket for Fabrica screening on 2 Sept

Screening at Fabrica Gallery, Brighton on 2 September at 6:30pm. Tickets are £3. To book a ticket for Fabrica, click here. Address: Fabrica Gallery, 40 Duke Street, Brighton BN1 1AG. How to get to Fabrica.

Find out more about the artists and their work on our Meet the artists page by clicking here.

Below you can watch individual works from the Selected 11 programme.


Gaby Sahhar, Truth and Kinship, 2020

Truth and Kinship is shot in Tower Hamlets, Canary Wharf and Isle of Dogs. Steeped in history as one of the largest ports for trade in the UK this is a landscape determined by extreme wealth divides, aggressive property development and finance. Narrated by a disembodied, genderless voice that recounts memories speaking of pain, longing and desire we watch three young people from diverse backgrounds navigate this hostile space in their quest for social mobility. The main protagonist, a suited white male uses his privilege to explore his sexual identity, fetishising queerness at the expense of others. Limited by his homophobia he resumes a life of heteronormativity and access to capital having delved to far into queer subculture. The film considers the different daily realities the characters encounter in public space. Hierarchical and in a state of perpetual mutation Truth and Kinship questions how the city adapts to serve the capitalist male identity to the detriment of others.

 


Sam Grant, Final Poetic, 2020

Shot over three days in Norfolk, Final Poetic is an impressionistic moving image piece of the British north. It aims to reframe the image of the natural world away from the literality of its geography and into the subjective experience of rural England. Beyond the realms of objective representation there is an internal space that we project outward onto the canvas of the world. It is the ambition of this film to portray just one of those potentially limitless impressions.

 


River CaoRiver is My Hometown, 2021

River is My Hometown is an elegy, an elegy for Cao.

River is My Hometown is driven by a strong sense of loss. When Cao faces the loss of his hometown following the disaster of the flood and the question of his identity, he tries to build his own language space to re-translate his subjective emotions. The traditional mourning ceremony of his hometown “plead for water” becomes a key clue — an entrance into the self-language space. It substantiates his sad thoughts and returns him as a revenant to a hometown that transcends the geographic concept.

 


Aoibheann Greenan, Dingbox, 2020

Dingbox by Aoibheann Greenan draws on the internet phenomenon of unboxing videos, pushing the format’s haptic qualities to elicit its strangely seductive power. Dingbox performs the unboxing dynamic as burlesque, stretching the narrative structure to its logical extreme. The film loops indefinitely, mimicking the cycle of production-consumption built on hidden labour and discarded waste.

 


Katayoun Jalilipour, Soosk, 2021

Soosk explores a queer utopian rewriting of a traditional Iranian children’s story named ‘Khale Sooske’, which originally follows a female cockroach’s hunt for a husband whilst normalising domestic violence. This retelling, ‘Soosk’, follows the journey of a cockroach who survives gender-based violence and finds a queer safe haven with the help of a non-binary divine being. Very importantly, Soosk revisits the trauma that sexist and abusive rhetoric in children’s stories contribute to, especially for queer people. Soosk is a fictional fantasy about queer euphoria, and the freedom queerness offers from the struggles under hetero-patriarchy.

 


Roxy Rezvany, Wifi Rider, 2020

Life is lonely for young Palestinian, Shukri. He spends his days on the internet, immersed in a world where  Western popstars preach self-love and unity, and where he can forget the lack of acceptance he faces in everyday life. But a life dreaming of paradise abroad does not bode well for a teenager stuck in East Jerusalem. What he desperately wants is to connect with others like him, who feel caught between an occupation, globalisation, and the universal growing pains that come with adulthood. In this 16mm documentary film, we follow Shukri from a childhood in East Jerusalem to moving to the hillside apartments of Amman, Jordan and the sandy shores of the Dead Sea. We discover the origins of his life as the Wifi Rider, and how he channelled his frustrations into art on the internet.

 

Produced by videoclub and Film London Artists’ Moving Image Network (FLAMIN). Supported by Arts Council England and Film London. 

Film London Artists’ Moving Image Network

Film London Artists’ Moving Image Network (FLAMIN) was launched in 2005 as a one-stop resource to provide artists working in the moving image with access to funding, guidance and development opportunities. Through unique commissioning funds, FLAMIN has commissioned over 150 productions, and supported the careers of countless other artists with programmes of one-to-one advice sessions, residencies and workshops.

www.filmlondon.org.uk/flamin

      

 

Aoibheann Greenan, Dingbox, 2020 – courtesy of the artist

Selected 11 – UK Screenings and Exhibition

A young man sits in the back seat of a car with the window open, he wears a black cap and pink hooded sweatshirt. The car is driving down a busy street at night. Other cars follow behind with their lights on. Lit up buildings and streetlights overhead can be seen behind the car.
Roxy Rezvany, Wifi Rider, 2020 – courtesy of the artist

Selected brings together some of the best work from early career film and video artists from across the UK in a vibrant programme of recent artists’ moving image. 

Book a ticket for Fabrica screening on 2 Sept

Screening at Fabrica Gallery, Brighton on 2 September at 6:30pm. Tickets are £3. To book a ticket for Fabrica, click here. Address: Fabrica Gallery, 40 Duke Street, Brighton BN1 1AG. How to get to Fabrica.

The Selected programme was established 11 years ago with the aims of supporting artist filmmakers to gain greater visibility and to bring new, diverse moving image work to audiences. Each year the artists who are shortlisted for the Film London Jarman Award nominate artists who are earlier in their careers and from those nominations a programme is curated by videoclub and Film London Artists’ Moving Image Network (FLAMIN).

The nominators for this year’s programme of Selected (and the artists shortlisted for the Jarman Award in 2020) are: Michelle Williams Gamaker, Hannah Quinlan & Rosie Hastings, Jenn Nkiru, Project Art Works, Larissa Sansour and Andrea Luka Zimmerman.

The artists for the 11th programme of Selected are: River Yuhao Cao, Sam Grant, Aoibheann Greenan, Katayoun Jalilipour, Roxy Rezvany and Gaby Sahhar.

Screening and exhibitions of programme online

Selected 11 was shown across the UK with partners throughout 23-29 August 2021, including online with Nottingham Contemporary, Spike Island (Bristol), Phoenix (Leicester) and a live screening at Fabrica Gallery (Brighton) on 2 September. The programme was available on our site during 23-29 August.

In conversation with artists with Nottingham Contemporary on 25 August

An in conversation with artists Aoibheann Greenan, Katayoun Jalilipour and Roxy Rezvany talking with Ian Haydn Smith (editor of Curzon Magazine) launched online on 25 August at 6:30pm. An archive of the talk can be watched. Watch the talk by clicking here.

In conversation with artists with Spike Island on 26 August

An in conversation with artists River Cao, Sam Grant and Gaby Sahhar talking with Ian Haydn Smith (editor of Curzon Magazine) took place on 26 August at 6pm. An archive of the talk can be watched. Watch the talk by clicking here.

Programme of work:

  • Gaby Sahhar, Truth and Kinship, 2020, 9:26 mins
  • Roxy Rezvany, Wifi Rider, 2020, 13 mins
  • River Yuhao Cao, River is My Hometown, 2021, 8:05 mins
  • Aoibheann Greenan, Dingbox, 2020, 5 min
  • Katayoun Jalilipour, Soosk, 2021, 12 mins
  • Sam Grant, Final Poetic, 2020, 1:49 mins

Find out more about the artists and their work on our Meet the artists page by clicking here.

Gaby Sahhar, Truth and Kinship, 2020 – courtesy of the artist

Gaby Sahhar, Truth and Kinship, 2020

Truth and Kinship is shot in Tower Hamlets, Canary Wharf and Isle of Dogs. Steeped in history as one of the largest ports for trade in the UK this is a landscape determined by extreme wealth divides, aggressive property development and finance. Narrated by a disembodied, genderless voice that recounts memories speaking of pain, longing and desire we watch three young people from diverse backgrounds navigate this hostile space in their quest for social mobility. The main protagonist, a suited white male uses his privilege to explore his sexual identity, fetishising queerness at the expense of others. Limited by his homophobia he resumes a life of heteronormativity and access to capital having delved to far into queer subculture. The film considers the different daily realities the characters encounter in public space. Hierarchical and in a state of perpetual mutation Truth and Kinship questions how the city adapts to serve the capitalist male identity to the detriment of others.

Roxy Rezvany, Wifi Rider, 2020 – courtesy of the artist

Roxy Rezvany, Wifi Rider, 2020

Life is lonely for young Palestinian, Shukri. He spends his days on the internet, immersed in a world where  Western popstars preach self-love and unity, and where he can forget the lack of acceptance he faces in everyday life. But a life dreaming of paradise abroad does not bode well for a teenager stuck in East Jerusalem. What he desperately wants is to connect with others like him, who feel caught between an occupation, globalisation, and the universal growing pains that come with adulthood. In this 16mm documentary film, we follow Shukri from a childhood in East Jerusalem to moving to the hillside apartments of Amman, Jordan and the sandy shores of the Dead Sea. We discover the origins of his life as the Wifi Rider, and how he channelled his frustrations into art on the internet.

River Yuhao Cao, River is My Hometown, 2021 – courtesy of the artist

River Yuhao Cao, River is My Hometown, 2021

River is My Hometown is an elegy, an elegy for Cao. 

River is My Hometown is driven by a strong sense of loss. When Cao faces the loss of his hometown following the disaster of the flood and the question of his identity, he tries to build his own language space to re-translate his subjective emotions. The traditional mourning ceremony of his hometown “plead for water” becomes a key clue — an entrance into the self-language space. It substantiates his sad thoughts and returns him as a revenant to a hometown that transcends the geographic concept. 

Aoibheann Greenan, Dingbox, 2020 – courtesy of the artist

Aoibheann Greenan, Dingbox, 2020

Dingbox by Aoibheann Greenan draws on the internet phenomenon of unboxing videos, pushing the format’s haptic qualities to elicit its strangely seductive power. Dingbox performs the unboxing dynamic as burlesque, stretching the narrative structure to its logical extreme. The film loops indefinitely, mimicking the cycle of production-consumption built on hidden labour and discarded waste.

Katayoun Jalilipour, Soosk, 2021 – courtesy of the artist

Katayoun Jalilipour, Soosk, 2021

Soosk explores a queer utopian rewriting of a traditional Iranian children’s story named ‘Khale Sooske’, which originally follows a female cockroach’s hunt for a husband whilst normalising domestic violence. This retelling, ‘Soosk’, follows the journey of a cockroach who survives gender-based violence and finds a queer safe haven with the help of a non-binary divine being. Very importantly, Soosk revisits the trauma that sexist and abusive rhetoric in children’s stories contribute to, especially for queer people. Soosk is a fictional fantasy about queer euphoria, and the freedom queerness offers from the struggles under hetero-patriarchy.

Sam Grant, Final Poetic, 2020 – courtesy of the artist

Sam Grant, Final Poetic, 2020

Shot over three days in Norfolk, Final Poetic is an impressionistic moving image piece of the British north. It aims to reframe the image of the natural world away from the literality of its geography and into the subjective experience of rural England. Beyond the realms of objective representation there is an internal space that we project outward onto the canvas of the world. It is the ambition of this film to portray just one of those potentially limitless impressions.

Produced by videoclub and Film London Artists’ Moving Image Network (FLAMIN). Supported by Arts Council England and Film London. 

Film London Artists’ Moving Image Network

Film London Artists’ Moving Image Network (FLAMIN) was launched in 2005 as a one-stop resource to provide artists working in the moving image with access to funding, guidance and development opportunities. Through unique commissioning funds, FLAMIN has commissioned over 150 productions, and supported the careers of countless other artists with programmes of one-to-one advice sessions, residencies and workshops.

www.filmlondon.org.uk/flamin

      

Selected 11 – Meet the artists

Nominated by the artists shortlisted for the Jarman Award 2020, Selected is a collection of diverse, surprising and provocative new film by early career artists from across the UK. Selected 11 includes work by: River Cao, Sam Grant, Aoibheann Greenan, Katayoun Jalilipour, Roxy Rezvany and Gaby Sahhar. Here you can read about each artists in this programme:

River Cao

River Yuhao Cao, River is My Hometown, 2021 – courtesy of the artist

River Cao is a London-based Chinese artist working with performance and moving image. He finished his MA at the Royal College of Art – CAP (Moving Image) in 2021. River’s works are deeply rooted in his environment and memories of his hometown – a small town by the river in southern China. Using mourning as a method, he creates a series of self-focused narrative spaces to rethink the emotion of grief. His work attempts to relieve his inner sense of loss, which is rooted in a desire for tranquility and fantasy.

Sam Grant

Sam Grant, Final Poetic, 2020 – courtesy of the artist

Sam Grant is an artist based in Solihull, who primarily uses the mediums of photography and video to explore themes related to his own experiences with autism. His work includes abstract depictions of sensory issues, social isolation and emotional processing in the attempt to convey the feelings experienced by an individual on the spectrum to a neurotypical audience.

Aoibheann Greenan

Aoibheann Greenan, Dingbox, 2020 – courtesy of the artist

Aoibheann Greenan is an Irish artist exploring the confluence of matter and psyche in the post-digital landscape. Her work has recently been selected for New Contemporaries 2021. Greenan’s work has been presented at The Starr Cinema, Tate Modern; DRAF, London; Raven Row, London; KW Institute, Berlin; Import Projects, Berlin; IMMA, Dublin; Project Arts Centre, Dublin; Temple Bar Gallery, Dublin; EVA International, Limerick; The RHA, Dublin. Greenan is co-founder of artist collective East London Cable.

Katayoun Jalilipour

Katayoun Jalilipour, Soosk, 2021 – courtesy of the artist

Katayoun Jalilipour is an Iranian born multidisciplinary artist, performer and writer based in the UK. ​ They often use their body as the subject to explore race, gender identity and sexuality, through humourous storytelling, using a variety of mediums such as digital image-making, gifs, video and live performance. ​ ​They are currently an associate lecturer on BA Performance: Design and Practice at Central Saint Martins. ​

Roxy Rezvany

Roxy Rezvany, Wifi Rider, 2020 – courtesy of the artist

Roxy Rezvany is an award-winning British filmmaker whose work aims to expand perceptions of British identity, and bring marginalised narratives to the mainstream. In 2018, she was recognised by The Dots as a Creative Trailblazer, featured in It’s Nice That’s Creative Review, and was on the cover of Broadcast Magazine’s ‘Hot Shots’ magazine issue. Her debut film Little Pyongyang premiered in competition at CPH:Dox Festival, and was the recipient of awards including Best Director at Underwire Film Festival and Best Documentary at The Smalls Film Festival. She has directed films for the BBC, Victoria Miro, VICE and The Guardian.

Gaby Sahhar

Gaby Sahhar, Truth and Kinship, 2020 – courtesy of the artist

Gaby Sahhar is a French-Palestinian artist based in London, working across painting, film and installation. In 2020, their film Truth and Kinship was screened at BFI London Film Festival and DRAF, London. Their work has been exhibited at Moscow International Biennale for Young Art, Moscow; South London Gallery, London; Science Gallery, London; Almanac Projects, Turin; Arcadia Missa, London and Sweetwater, Berlin. Since 2017, they have run the LGBTQI+ project space and artist support network, Queerdirect.

Click here to read about the programme and touring dates.

Selected is produced by videoclub and Film London Artists’ Moving Image Network (FLAMIN), supported by Arts Council England and Film London.

      

UK & South African artists join Vital Capacities for August

Five images by resident artists form a composite - on the far left, a man painted grey with a beard wears a blue smock. Top centre a man glides horizontally above a woman sat leaning forward in a wheelchair in a dance pose. On the top right a deepinkish red swirl of absract light blends iwht black background. Bottom right a ploughed field has small plants growing in rows, path of green plants runs through the centre. Bottom centre a person with bunched up green hair and rainbow sparkly jacket stands before an audience in a gallery, a laptop open next to them.
Five images by resident artists form a composite - on the far left, a man painted grey with a beard wears a blue smock. Top centre a man glides horizontally above a woman sat leaning forward in a wheelchair in a dance pose. On the top right a deepinkish red swirl of absract light blends iwht black background. Bottom right a ploughed field has small plants growing in rows, path of green plants runs through the centre. Bottom centre a person with bunched up green hair and rainbow sparkly jacket stands before an audience in a gallery, a laptop open next to them.
Artists and their work from far left image clockwise: Siphenati Mayekiso; Nadine Mckenzie; …kruse; Artist Rebekah Ubuntu (pictured), commissioned performance at Tate Britain, image courtesy of Tate London. Find Rebekah online @rebekahubuntu

For the fifth Vital Capacities‘ residency, we partner with Institute for Creative Arts (Cape Town) and Wysing Art Centre (Cambridge) to work with artists from both South Africa and the UK. From 2 August, artists Siphenati Mayekiso, Nadine Mckenzie, Rebekah Ubuntu and …kruse will join Vital Capacities, to undertake research and develop new work. Working with our partners, they will explore and exchange new ideas using their studio spaces, and create new work throughout the residency.

The artists for August 2021’s residency are:

Siphenathi Mayekiso (SA) was born in Cape Town and grew up between the city and the rural areas of Eastern Cape. His introduction to Theatre and Performance started at the age of 13, when he was part of forming a drama youth group at IThemba Labantu Centre. His hunger for storytelling took him to UNIMASA to learn puppetry skills, and this is where his group won the Active Puppetry Competition.  Two years later he joined the Magnet Theatre training program under the direction of Jennie Reznek and Mark Fleishman. After graduating, he went on to Okiep and joined the Garage Dance Company for intense workshops under the tutelage of Alfred Hinkel. His ever-growing hunger for performance took him to an integrated dance company called Unmute Dance Company. There he started as a trainee and later outreach teacher, a facilitator, a company dance member, and a choreographer. So far, he has presented his solo work called Blood Bath under the direction of the late Standard Bank Young Artist Themba Mbuli in South Africa and Germany.

Nadine Mckenzie (SA) is a qualified integrated dance teacher, receiving training from Alito Alessi at the ImpulsTanz International festival in Vienna in 2010. In 2006 she joined  Remix Dance Company. Since then she had produced exceptional work as a  performer/ teacher in a wheelchair and has established herself as a well-recognized figure within the performing arts community both nationally and internationally.

Rebekah Ubuntu (UK) is a multidisciplinary artist, musician and university lecturer. Their practice explores speculative fiction through electronic music, sound art, voice, performance, installation, text, songwriting and the moving image. Ubuntu has been commissioned and exhibited work by Tate Britain, Tate Modern, Frieze London, Barbican Centre, Adam Mickiewicz Institute (Poland), Diametre Gallery (Paris), New Art Exchange (Nottingham), FACT (Liverpool) and London’s Serpentine Galleries.

…kruse (UK) is a neurodivergent, experimental artist and writer, whose practice includes drawing, text, storytelling and autoethnographical research. …kruse uses walking, short hikes and longer pilgrimages, to gather data and stories and explore her relationship with the Earth. She is interested in the connections between landscape, mythmaking, magic and science.

Residencies will launch on 2 August – to follow what the artists are up to join the mailing list and follow them on: vitalcapacities.com

August’s residency programme is delivered in partnership with Institute for Creative Arts and Wysing Art Centre, with support from Arts Council England.

 

Vital Capacities is an accessible, purpose-built digital residency space, that supports artists’ practice while engaging audiences with their work.

Vital Capacities has been created by videoclub in consultation with artists, digital inclusion specialist Sarah Pickthall and website designer Oli Pyle.

       

 

Arts Council England funding logo (Lottery)